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review of the NET Bible review of the Net New Testament NET Bible review evangelicalism evangelical Dallas Theological Seminary

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or simply scroll down. Large reviews are in a PDF file format.

Quotes are indicated via a different font and weight.

 

BOOK TITLE, or Editions

0001

Title:Holy Bible: The Holy Scriptures in the Original Languages

author: (publisher) Trinitarian Bible Society

year published: 1998

 

0002

Title: New American Standard Bible: Reference Edition.

author: (publisher) Foundation Press

year published: 2001

 

0003

Title: Mt. Sinai Arabic Codex 151

author: Harvey Staal

year published: 1983/84

 

0004

Title: The Luther Bible of 1534 | Complete Facsimile Edition

author: Martin Luther

year published: 2003

 

0005

Title: The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005

author: (editors) Dr. Maurice A. Robinson and William G. Pierpont

year published: 2005

 

0006

Title: A Reader's Hebrew Bible

author: (editors) Dr's. A. Philip Brown II, and Bryan W. Smith

year published: 2008

 

0007

Title: The Trinity: Evidences and Issues

author: Dr. Robert Morey

year published: 2002 (copyright 1996)

 

0008

The Scofield Reference Bibles

 

0009

The Revised Standard Version (1946+ New Testament)

 

0010

The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: A New Translation.

Ronald Arbuthnot Knox

0011

Letters to Young Churches: A Translation of the New Testament Epistles.

J. B. Phillips.

 

0012

The Westminster Study Edition of The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments: In the Authorized (King James) Version

 

0013

The New Testament: A Translation in the Language of the People. Charles B. Williams.

 

--- CLICK TO RETURN TO HOME/MAIN PAGE

Grading scales of the English Bibles reviewed below are as follows: 1 through 10, with 10 being the best or

most accurate, that is how accurately does it render its BASE TEXT. The "base text" are those

which the editor/translator claims to follow.

Value "to Christian faith", for delivering truth and accuracy, is also 1 through 10.

Value as a collectible book: also 1 -10, with 10 being very valuable or RARE..

TITLE: [0001]

Holy Bible: The Holy Scriptures in the Original Languages [New Testament and Old Testament

[titles also in Greek and Hebrew scripts]

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Beza - Greek (TR), Bomberg - Hebrew

Accuracy of translation - - - - - NA

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 8

Value as a collectible book - - 3

 

PUBLISHER:

The Trinitarian Bible Society

Tyndale House Dorset Road

London, SW19 3NN

 

ORDERING INFORMATION USA:

Trinitarian Bible Society

1600 Leonard Street NW

Grand Rapids, MI 49504

(616) 735-3695

website: www.trinitarianbiblesocietyusa.org

 

DATE REVIEWED: February 2006

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

Hard Cover, smyth sewn 2,288 total (1,808 OT: 480 NT) 6 3/4 x 4 1/2 inches bright white, no ANSI info, no acidity statement. .00115 inches thick

 

Price: $31.15 (Dec. 2005). An amazing value for such a fine book! The volume fits well in the hand, and lays flat (open) on any page. The paper is very thin, which results in a volume which is 1 9/16 inches thick. The thin paper exhibits some bleed, but is tolerable. The bright white is a bit glaring as contrasted with the fine black print. The print and fonts are sharp and clean, the text is very readable, the margins are adequate. The Hebrew pointing is very clear. All pages exhibited a nice consistent gray-type-contrast (no excessively light or dark pages!).

See sample page images:

 

The Hebrew text is that of Ginsburg's edition of the Jacob ben Chayim version, as printed by Bomberg in 1524-1525. It has the Masorah (at the foot of each page) from these editions, with the references listed at the front of the OT text. The text is taken from the plates of the multi-volume edition of Ginsburg's work in 1894. The book titles are all in Hebrew.

The New Testament Greek text is that of Beza's 1598 edition. Basically it is the Textus Receptus. No notes or any foot notes. Book titles are all in Greek.

For the person who needs and likes having on-hand the complete Bible in its original languages, this is a recommended volume. Even, with the Masorah it is not recommended for critical textual evaluations, as it is just purely the Second Rabbinic Bible and the TR. However, it is handy for use in church services and reading. It is "cheap" when compared to the prices of other complete original language Bibles. The only negative point is the somewhat fragile paper, it cannot endure rough handling. But such a handsome work is usually treated with all due respect. The smyth-sewn binding, and the hard covers make this a very desirable book, it is a work of art!

sample NT

 

 

sample OT

 

TITLE: [0002]

New American Standard Bible: Reference Edition.

ISBN: 0-910618-49-6 (style number 861)

 

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Nestles - Greek; BHS - Hebrew

Accuracy of translation - - - - - 8

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 8

Value as a collectible book - - 5 (first edition)

 

PUBLISHER:

Foundation Publications, Inc.

Anaheim, California 92816

 

ORDERING INFORMATION:

American Bible Sales

P.O. Box 5158

Fullerton, CA 92838

1-(800)-535-5131

 

DATE REVIEWED: March 2006

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

Genuine Leather, smyth sewn 1,842 total (1,344 OT: 404 NT) 6 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches bright white, no ANSI info, no acidity statement. .00155 inches thick. Special French paper.

 

Price, as of March 2006, was listed as $52.49 - via American Bible Sales (above). I have, over the years, examined dozens and dozens of personal Bibles—those which most church-goers carry to service, use for personal Bible reading and study; many of these editions are very poor products. Their paper is too thin, and often bleed-through makes reading a pain as type from the other side bleeds through. Many have a cheap glue-injected binding, which means that backs will break and pages fall out. In many the margins are too narrow for proper page proportions, with little or no room for notes.

Not so this Bible. It is extremely finely bound! It has beautiful gold gilded edges. The paper is a special French-produced paper. Thin, but with minimal bleed-through. The maps are also on the same paper stock, which retains the strength of the binding. The basic leather edition is very nice leather. They also have a calfskin leather bound edition for about $112.00.

 

 

As you can see this full-sized image reveals generous margins for notes, the point size is about 14 points, so reading is not a chore. This particular recommended edition, is referred to as the "Side-Column Reference Bible", the "Updated Edition". Again the ISBN number is: 0-910618-49-6. There is a thumb indexed edition available as well. You will find several other features which make this a GREAT personal reference Bible!

 

(1) NO red letters!

(2) NO added religious commentary or notes

(3) NO poorly printed pages (none too light or too dark or fuzzy) all are SHARP.

 

The text is of course the updated version of the venerable NASB. It is a very literal English translation. It is the best (so far) of all of the English translations which reflect the modern eclectic Greek New Testament. (Recall that there are basically two streams of Greek New Testaments, one representing the vast Majority Text, and those few representing the Egyptian text type manuscripts, this edition reflects the Egyptian text type (the Nestle Aland Text). For the other stream, which is actually a more accurate Greek text, users have fewer English selections (basically the KJV and the NKJV).

 

In this updated edition the most noticeable change is the THEE's and the THOU's are rendered as YOU and YOUR, (et al) for the benefit of today's modern readers. Which I see as a flaw, lost is the respectability seen with the more noble and solemn expressions.

Also several Majority Text passages have been printed in the main body, and not consigned to the footnotes! The overall changes effected in the updated version are actually a major improvement, making numerous sentences easier to understand! Some improvements are long over-due corrections, such as the insertion of "Jacob" in Genesis 30:5. However, as translations go, this is one of the best commercial Bibles extant in English. I would like yet to see a correction as concerns the participle and the word "after" changed in Acts 11:17 (they seem to render the time sequence wrong)-- I would suggest instead of "after believing"-- reading "when believing" or even "while believing", but certainly not "after" which indicates SUBSEQUENT action!

Many Bibles have colored maps on thicker stock, which is okay, but this thicker signature often stresses the binding over time. In this Bible the grayscale maps (10 maps total) are on regular stock, hence no stress!. At the end of the NT text, is a handy 82 page concordance, with room for additions.

 

There is a presentation page, and a 7 page introduction. Marginal cross references (in the side margin) are very very full for a personal Bible. Translation notes are also presented in the margin. All of which enhances the value of this translation.

 

In the sample page (to the side) note verse 18:

For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us

who are being saved.....

 

Note the two reference numbers, 1 and 2, next to the verbs "ARE". Now the printed text is very accurate to the Greek here, a process is meant in the Greek. Thus ARE BEING SAVED (and ARE PERISHING) are true to the underlying Greek. Paul is not discussing salvation here, he is talking about the daily relationships believers have with the written Word and in their daily experiences. Each day we believers are BEING RESCUED, each day we are in the hands of God. Each day the perishing sow and reap corruption. Such accuracy is a great assist to those who only use the KJV. (The KJV translators often missed the real intent of numerous verb formations in the original Greek).

 

Consequently, this NASB (updated edition) is highly recommended as THE alternative and supplementary (or primary) translation to the venerable KJV. Use BOTH, [use both the KJV and the NASB or the updated NASB] and greatly enhance your personal studies. For a paltry $60.00 you can own a GREAT translation, in a bound edition which will last the user a lifetime! Get them while they last! Remember, well-made Bibles today are becoming quite rare (compared to the number of poorly made editions) and quite costly.

sample I Cor.

TITLE: [0003]

Mt. Sinai Arabic Codex 151

(in 4 volumes of 2 parts: part I - Pauline Epistles: part II - Acts and the Catholic Epistles)

 

PUBLISHER:

Peeters Publishers (Belgium)

 

ORDERING INFORMATION:

web site:

http://www.peeters-leuven.be

 

DATE REVIEWED: March 2006

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

soft cover , smyth sewn 768 total (all four volumes) 6 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches (trimmed) no ANSI info, no acidity statement. .0038 inches thick.

 

Price as of March 2006 for all 4 volumes, 216 Euro. The price per volume - volume 1 Pauline Epistles (452) is Euro 75, Pauline Epistles part II (453), Euro 69. Acts and Catholic epistles part I (462) is Euro 40 and Acts and the Catholic Epistles part II (463) is Euro 32.

 

All four volumes are a part of the prestigious CSCO series (Corpus Scriptorum Christianorum Orientalium). The above numbers in parentheses are the CSCO numbers. Including money transfers and postage, the two Pauline volumes cost me a total of $190.00. Ahh, but the volumes are worth the price!

Dr. Harvey Staal (1922 - 1999) spent many years of his life producing this work upon this Arabic manuscript, which now rests in Mt Sinai as Arabic MS 151. It is the oldest dated Arabic NT (praxapostolos). It was written in Damascus in A.D. 867, by a scribe/scholar named Bishr Ibn Al Sirri. The Arabic was translated from a Syriac exemplar.

Dr. Staal meticulously transcribes the Arabic text AND marginal Arabic notes of the entire manuscript into easy to read text:

In the other sample, from the Arabic volume, we are viewing I Corinthians chapter 1 verse 1. In the image we see the same text, but translated into English, in the English volume of I Corinthians 1:1...

In each sample image one sees the quality of the printing. No, pages are too dark or too light. The volumes ship uncut, and I trimmed about 1/8" off top, bottom and side. Though there is no acidity statement as concerns the paper, it feels supple and feels acid free. The smyth sewn signatures insure long lasting durability. The volumes do not easily lie flat when opened, but when pressed will lay flat. In the Arabic text volumes, Dr. Staal presents us with 5 or 6 good grayscale images of the actual manuscript and its cover. Each volume has an index of peoples and places in English.

 

The Arabic text is very sharp and quite readable. No one is sure yet as to the text-type (Egyptian, Byzantine or Western, or..(?)) which MS Arabic 151 reflects. Staal tested a few chapters and suspected an Egyptian alignment. I am using it in my work on I Corinthians, and I shall thoroughly test it in I Corinthians.

Staal used the film of the manuscript, which is a challenge to read as the Arabic is unpointed. However he spent 5 days in the Sinai monastery validating his finished work. As a result we today have the finished product. A beautiful labor of love, giving us the text of this Arabic translation of a Syriac MS in Damascus in the year 867. Dr. Staal has done us a great service, we can now study this important Arabic manuscript at leisure.

Arabic text

 

English trans.

TITLE: [0004]

The Luther Bible of 1534 [Biblia]

(in 3 volumes, 2 hardcovers form the Biblia, and a softcover is the introductory text)

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Rabbinic - Hebrew, Erasmus - Greek

Accuracy of translation - - - - - 8

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 8

Value as a collectible book - - 9

PUBLISHER:

Taschen, GmbH; Cologne

 

ORDERING INFORMATION:

web site:

http://www.taschen.com

 

DATE REVIEWED: August 2006

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

hard covers, smyth sewn. Soft cover also smyth sewn. the 2 hardcovers - circa 1860 pages total. 64 pages for the softcover 7 3/4 x 12 inches (trimmed) no ANSI info, no acidity statement. .00365 inches thick. Softcover uses coated paper.

 

Price as of 2006, ranges from $75.00 to $150.00. Christian Book Distributors has/had the 3 volumes for $75.00.

These are sizable volumes reflecting the original size (see image for measurement) of Luther's 1534 Bible. They are durably bound, and beautifully printed and executed. The facsimiles are printed via an offset lithography, a four-color process. The digitizing was done by the Göttinger DigitalisierungsZentrum der Staats-und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen.

Even at $125.00 these fine volumes are a bargain! The printing is exquisite! Each page is carefully reproduced, even the foxing marks and light water stains! The bleeds are also visible in these incredible reproductions! Consequently these volumes give to each owner a great copy of Luther's 1534 German Bible! In fact, these copies may even be better than the original, as the original was in a fire shortly after this facsimile was created - however the original was not burned, it suffered some light water damage [at the Herzogin Anna Amelia Library]. In 2010, the work was out of print, which drives up the value of the copies available. Though the German is archaic, it is a very accurate translation of the Hebrew and Greek texts. The very first German Bible to be translated from the original languages! The earlier German translations were made from the Latin.

Volume one contains Genesis through the Song of Solomon, volume two begins with Isaiah and finishes with Revelation. The apocrypha follows Malachi. Throughout the two hardcover volumes, Luther's introductions are faithfully preserved. In these volumes, the wood-block illuminations are hand-colored, thus this facsimile was made from a deluxe and initials may have been colored by the master Lucas Cranach (the younger). The woodcuts were commissioned by Döring himself.

Stephen Füssel provides the wonderful softcover introductory edition. It is a beautiful work illustrating the history of the early German Bibles! It handsomely (with its gorgeous illustrations) supplements these two hardcover volumes of Martin Luther's Biblia. This work is highly recommended. What amazes me, it the low cost! The facsimile editon of Codex Vaticanus costs $5,000 - $6,000 and it may not even equal the quality of this facsimile edition of Luther's Bible! (Perhaps the Vatican's edition of Codex Vaticanus [only 450 copies were printed] helps pay their attorney fees!). :-)

Psalm 1

(the original is not as yellow as is this adjusted reproduction)

TITLE: [0005]

The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Majority of Greek MSS

Accuracy of translation - - - - - NA

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 9

Value as a collectible book - - 8

 

PUBLISHER:

Chilton Book Publishing, Southborough, Massachusetts

 

ORDERING INFORMATION:

Chilton Book Publishing

P.O. Box 606

Southborough, MA 01772-0606

(as well as from Dr. Robinson Himself - see below)

 

DATE REVIEWED: February 2010/2012

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

hard covers, smyth sewn. xxiv plus 586 9 1/4 x 6 inches (trimmed) alkaline paper, .0037 inches thick. Bright white.

 

ISBN 13: 978-0-7598-0077-9

Cost is an economical $16-$18 dollars, via Amazon! [but see below] As seen in the sample image, unlike the earlier editions of Robinson/Pierpont, this edition is fully accented. It also shows many of the variations between this edition and that of the Nestle/Aland text(s), at the bottom of each page. The preface is completely revised from its earlier state as seen in the 1991 softcover edition.

A nice feature is located on the outer margins, wherein a handful of significant inter- textual differences amongst the Byzantine MSS themselves are displayed, hence the user has in hand a very fine edition of the Byzantine text-type. (no outer marginal readings are seen in the sample image).

 

As editors, Robinson and Pierpont did make some decisions as to the displaying of certain minor variants, these are mentioned in their preface. This they did thoroughly; after testing their efforts I have found their decisions typically reflecting the real MAJORITY of Byzantine MSS.. Minor deviations exist as noted below, but they are minor,

For example at I Corinthians 1:2, the adverb "all" (pasin) has the final nu indicated in this edition; this does not reflect the proper Attic (and Ionic) rule, (since the word precedes a word beginning with a consonant without intervening punctuation, the final -n is usually omitted) which rule was observed by most Byzantine scribes (though not all). In this case they - Robinson and Pierpont made a decision which did not also follow the consensus of existing Byzantine MSS here at I Cor. 1:2. The vast majority of Byzantine MSS omit the final nu here, and read "pasi". By not displaying the consensus reading here, an anomaly is manifest in this labor of Pierpont and Robinson. (Note most Egyptian MSS retain it and read "pasin").

As one peruses the must-read preface, one is struck by the studious avoidance of the term "majority" or "majority-text" (seen only once on page i). Instead one is confronted with the similar - "consensus text". Robinson and the late Pierpont, arrived at their consensus text via extraction from H. von Soden's large work from the earlier 20th century. Von Soden developed a methodology for recognizing MSS which formed the backbone of his "K" text-types (a majority or Byzantine text-type(s)). Robinson and Pierpont (as well as the Hodges/Farstad edition) relied heavily upon von Soden's classifications in texts other than the Apocalypse. (For the Apocalypse both utilized the work of Hoskier).

In reality, Robinson and Pierpont relied upon printed editions for their text, and did not do extensive or thorough collations of hundreds of manuscripts. (Only the Pericope seen in John, has been fully examined amongst most manuscripts). If one were to ask Dr. Robinson which Byzantine minuscules read "diakonian" instead of "koinonian" at I Corinthians 1:9?, he would have to run to von Soden or Swanson to give you an answer, as he himself did not collate this text in the actual manuscripts. Von Soden would only reveal 1 witness, Swanson 2 more. Beyond that Robinson could/can not answer you. I can provide more, as I have examined personally, (via films and photographs) many many manuscripts, I can thus speak with authority, and it is this very authority which this edition lacks! It is a derivative work, second-hand in nature. However, upon testing this work, it reveals an amazingly accurate Majority Text. The care which Robinson and Pierpont gave to this effort has paid off, it is also very close also to the Hodges/Farstad Majority text as well, exhibiting only minor orthographical variations, rarely do whole words or phrases vary. The advantage of the Robinson/Pierpont edition, is how quickly the user can readily see the major variations between the MT and that of the eclectic Nestle/Aland editions; as well as most inter-textual variations within the MT itself!!. Herein the user has a really useful tool, great for translators and investigators, and students who want a very nice readable copy of God's Word!!

 

As noted above, the "consensus text" as seen in Robinson and Pierpont, rests largely upon the labors of others, and not upon the collations done by Pierpont nor Robinson - as they did not do this type of necessary work. Necessary in that it provides a sure foundation and proof of an actual majority reading (or a reading which does not reflect the majority). Again, despite this lack, both the Robinson/ Pierpont and Hodges/Farstad editions are very similar. Their agreements are remarkable. Their texts are no doubt close to being the majority text (MT) as seen in the majority of Byzantine manuscripts throughout the centuries: but they fall short in being able to actually point to actual manuscript witnesses to prove their case.

Nevertheless, despite these orthographic decisions, and despite their lack of reliance upon word-for-word collations of hundreds of Greek Byzantine manuscripts, they produced a very commendable effort!! An effort which is easier to use than laboriously trying to extract the data from von Soden and elsewhere, and an effort which should set the stage for future efforts to produce an authorative text. As Dr. Dan Wallace once stated, the majority text can and should serve as the text against which all other texts and manuscripts should be collated. It is indeed the standard Greek text of God's Word. (Wallace- first indicated his preference for the MT for collation purposes in, Bibliotheca Sacra, January-March, 1990, pages 122f..)

Following the NT text, is an essay by Robinson outlining reasons why the Byzantine Text-type is superior to the later Egyptian text-types. Robinson's essay has never been answered by the advocates of the Egyptian recensions. (Perhaps they are unable to, Robinson's logic is clear and difficult to actually refute).

This volume has nice wide margins, and the text is very sharp, no pages misprinted. The book is sturdy and well made. The binding is a bit tight, and the volume does not lay open. Note that the paper is a bright white, and can strain the eyes.

 

TITLE: [0006]

A Reader's Hebrew Bible

 

PUBLISHER:

Zondervan

 

ORDERING INFORMATION:

web site:

www.zondervan.com

 

DATE REVIEWED: February 2010

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

soft leather- like covers, smyth sewn. xxviii, plus 1652 9 x 6 inches (trimmed) no ANSI info, no acidity statement. .0018 inches

 

ISBN 13: 978-0-310-26974-8

 

 

A beautiful publication, the cover is a flexible Italian made(?) duo-tone cover. The text is finely printed, and is quite sharp. The book comes in a nice box. Some bleed is seen in the sample.

The Hebrew text is that of the Westminster Leningrad codex (version 4.4), this being utilized in BibleWorks 7.0. All Hebrew words occurring 100 times or less, are indicated at the foot of each page, with a gloss, and some parsing if a verb. References are also made to standard Hebrew dictionaries (HALOT and BDB). All Aramaic words occurring 25 times or less are also likewise glossed. Page edges are silver gilded, I would have personally preferred thicker paper.

Ketib/Qere readings are also indicated in the text. Proper names occurring 100 times or less, are indicated by a lighter type. These editors (both with PhDs, of Bob Jones University) did a really fine job. The text is easy to use: the bleed is noticable, and is a minor flaw, in my opinion. Zondervan, now owned by a large publishing concern, still produces poor quality bindings for many of its hardcovers, however this volume is an exception. The price is about $40.00 - $49.00, and is a bargain. You will really enjoy using and possessing this fine work for years to come! If your Hebrew is a bit rusty, this is the book for you.

 

TITLE: [0007]

The Trinity: Evidence and Issues

 

PUBLISHER:

World Bible Publishers, Inc.. Iowa Falls, Iowa.

 

 

DATE REVIEWED: pending

 

BINDING

NUMBER of PAGES

PAGE SIZE

PAPER INFO

hard cover, glue binding xii, plus 587 9 x 6 inches (trimmed) no ANSI info, no acidity statement. Bright white, .0050 inches
 

[0008]

The Scofield Reference Bibles

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KJV

Accuracy of translation - - - - - NA

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 8

Value as a collectible book - - 6 - 1967: 8 - 1909

1946
The Scofield Reference Bible: The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments: Authorized King James Version. Edited by Rev. C. I. Scofield. Oxford University Press: New York. [This contains the full 1946 title].

Shows, Copyright 1909, 1917, renewed 1937 and 1945. Early printings also read: New and Improved Edition. Has an indexed Atlas and in later printings a Cyclopedic Concordance. Most early copies do not contain an added dictionary (per Hills #2444). Each of these editions, 1909, 1917, and this 1945[6] are all KJV. This edition typeset in Brevier 8vo, Black-faced. Scofield facsimile series No. 2. Bible text occupies 1353 pages, a later added Concordance another 370 pages, followed by 12 pages of maps, preceded by an index to the maps. (pagination per the 1946 edition minus concordance). Text is in a two column format, with a center reference column. In this edition the name of Rev. William L. Pettingill is added to the list of consulting editors. Volume is black, hardcover, with The Scofield Reference Bible intaglio on the front cover. Spine 21 cm., spine reads: HOLY BIBLE: Cyclopedic Concordance: Scofield Reference Edition: Oxford.

Paper is fine [.0020"] (recall this data is for the 1946 edition, reprinted in this instance in 1974), slightly off-white, smyth sewn with additional side stitching of first and last signatures. Volume is quite durable. The outer edges are stained red (in 1961 printings). Book lays flat when opened (a very desirable aspect!). Page margins are just over a 1/2 inch, the bleeding is minimal. This is one of the most desirable Bibles ever published (especially the hardcover 1967 edition, the New Scofield Reference Edition), in my opinion; truly a text fit for the journey of a lifetime.

In the "New" 1967 edition, numerous obsolete words in the 1611 KJV language are replaced in the text, they are indicated with a bar on each side of the word or phrase, and in the center column, one can see the original KJV rendering, it is linked with a superscript letter and preceded with the letters "KJV". For example at Exodus 39:13 the Scofield reads "...in |settings|...", and the note shows the KJV word "ouches" in place of "settings". Thus, the reader is given clear and accurate information, it is the venerable KJV on steriods! The resulting text is (in my opinion) far superior to all of the modern attempts to rephrase the 1611 KJV. Modern KJV III editions are currently in print from Oxford, the editions are usually with thumb indexing. They are not to be confused with the KJV III editions produced by Jay Green (see below). The 1967 editions were named:The New Scofield Reference Bible. Also in 1967, introductions to the books were brought up to date, over 700 new footnotes and over 15,000 more cross references were added. Earlier editions (all pre-1967 Scofields) do not alter the KJV text, nor does the newest (2007) Scofield Study Bible (III).

A nice feature of the Scofield Bibles is, at the top of each center column, seen the date of each book or events, though this feature is not seen in the original 1909 editions, it was added in the 1917 editions. By 1942 about 4,000,000 copies had been printed (both leather and otherwise).

The famous notes reflect the partial dispensational theological system, popular at Dallas Theological Seminary and Moody et al. Today, since the 1970s, numerous other versions, which are not KJV, use the Scofield reference system and notes. The entire reference system and notes were completely revised and published as the New Scofield Reference Bible in 1967, as noted above.

In 2007, Oxford issued the New Scofield Study Bible (KJV III) it reproduced the earlier 1967 edition, BUT placed the modern alterations in footnotes, thus leaving the KJV text itself unaltered.

Numerous editions of the1946 publication were (re)printed, the actual printing dates can often be found at the bottom of the last page of the concordance, or on the last page of the map index (seen as: 35M 48) which means thirty-five thousand copies printed in 1948. Sellers are usually unaware of the actual publication dates, and usually hawk the reprints as 1946. Various dust jackets were also produced, some blue and white, some red and white.

Suggested prices for used copies:

GOOD CONDITION:$45.00 (1909) - leather or hardcover

FINE: $110.00 (1909) leather or hardcover

 

The 1917 editions should be about 20% less than comparable 1909 editions.

 

For the New Scofields:


GOOD CONDITION: $20.00 (1946) - - - New Scofields (1967 and reprints) - $30.00

FINE: $50.00 (1946) - - - New Scofields (1967 and reprints) - $60.00

 

1909, the first edition; in 1917 a second edition was issued.

 

 

1946

 

1967

 

publishing data location, 1967 and later reprints. This one indicates, 52,000 copies reprinted in 1974.

0009

The Revised Standard Version (RSV) New Testament - First edition of NT - 1946.

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Westcott/Hort (basically), BHS - Hebrew

Accuracy of translation - - - - - 7

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 8

Value as a collectible book - - 5 (first edition)

Original title of the 1946 edition: "The New Covenant Commonly Called the New Testament of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Revised Standard Version". Thomas Nelson & Sons. Norwood Press, J. S. Cushing Co.. Also Berwick & Smith. First printing February 11, 1946. The title page also states: Translated from the Greek: Being the Version Set Forth in A. D. 1611 Revised A. D. 1881 and A. D. 1901: (original print form places the next statement on a lower separate line), Compared with the Most Ancient Authorities and Revised A. D. 1946. First printing has on the copyright page: copyright 1901, by Thomas Nelson & Sons; copyright renewed 1929, by the International Council of Religious Education; copyright 1946, by the International Council of Religious Education. (s.v. Hills #2453).

First edition has 553 pages, with an additional six page preface. Spine is 19 cm.. Words in a gold color on spine are: New Testament: Revised Standard Version: Nelson. Single column text, on slightly off-white paper. Smyth sewn binding in a blue hardcover. Around the edges of the front cover is engraved a fine gold-colored decorative border line. The copyright of the New Testament was renewed in 1973 by Division of Christian Education, National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.


In 1950 the copyright holder was changed to: Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States. Copies of the first edition of 1946, exhibit this change which began in 1950, otherwise the copy is very good, also having 553 pages. With this change in 1950 at least one other press became involved, it was the Van Rees Press. In 1962, and again in 1971 the RSV New Testament was revised.

The 2001 English Standard Version, (ESV) is largely the RSV slightly modernized, even retaining some of the original footnotes seen in the 1946 RSV [for example at I Corinthians 9:5].

FROM WIKIPEDIA

[ 1962 printings

Minor modifications to the RSV text were authorized in 1959 and completed for the 1962 printings. At the same time, other publishing companies besides Thomas Nelson were allowed to print it, including Zondervan, Holman, Melton, Oxford, Cokesbury, and the American Bible Society. Some of the changes included (but were not limited to) reverting to the Greek phrase "the husband of one wife" in 1 Timothy 3.2, 12 and Titus 1.6 (in the 1946-52 printing it was paraphrased as "married only once"), quoting the Roman centurion who witnessed Jesus' death as calling him "the Son of God" in Matthew 27.54 and Mark 15.39 (in 1946-52 he was quoted as calling Jesus "a son of God").


1971 Second Edition of the New Testament

In 1971, the RSV Bible was rereleased with the Second Edition of the Translation of the New Testament. Whereas in 1962 the translation panel had merely authorized a handful of changes, in 1971 they gave the New Testament text a thorough editing. This Second Edition incorporated Greek manuscripts not previously available to the RSV translation panel, namely, the Bodmer Papyri, published in 1956-61.

The most obvious changes were the restoration of Mark 16.9-20 (the long ending) and John 7.53-8.11 (in which Jesus forgives an adultress) to the text (in 1946, they were put in footnotes). Also restored was Luke 22.19b-20, containing the bulk of Jesus' institution of the Lord's Supper. In the 1946-52 text, this had been cut off at the phrase "This is my body", and the rest had only been footnoted, since this verse did not appear in the original Codex Bezae manuscript used by the translation committee. The description of Christ's ascension in Luke 24:51 had the footnote "... and was carried up into heaven" restored to the text. Luke 22.43-44, which had been part of the text in 1946-52, was relegated to the footnote section because of its questionable authenticity; in these verses an angel appears to Jesus in Gethsemane to strengthen and encourage Him before His arrest and crucifixion. Many other verses were rephrased or rewritten for greater clarity and accuracy. Moreover, the footnotes concerning monetary values were no longer expressed in terms of dollars and cents but in terms of how long it took to earn each coin (the denarius was no longer defined as twenty cents but as a day's wage). The book of Revelation, called "The Revelation to John" in the previous editions, was retitled "The Revelation to John (The Apocalypse)". Some of these changes to the RSV New Testament had already been introduced in the 1965-66 Catholic Edition, and their introduction into the Protestant edition was done to pave the way for the publication of the RSV Common Bible in 1973.]

In the original edition we might also note the addition of "chief" before "cornerstone", in Ephesians 2:20; in I Corinthians 10:17, the original "loaf" (2x) was later altered to "bread (2x).

The translation committees were as follows:

The New Testament Committee (prior to 1952)
Luther A. Weigle, Yale University, Chairman.
James Moffatt, Union Theological Seminary, Executive Secretary. (died 1944)
Henry J. Cadbury, Harvard University.
Edgar J. Goodspeed, University of Chicago.
Walter Russell Bowie, Union Theological Seminary.
Frederick C. Grant, Union Theological Seminary.
Millar Burrows, Yale University. (joined 1938)
Clarence T. Craig, Oberlin Graduate School of Theology.
Abdel R. Wentz, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg.

The Old Testament Committee (prior to 1952)
Luther A. Weigle, Yale University, Chairman.
Fleming James, University of the South, Executive Secretary.
Julius A. Bewer, Union Theological Seminary.
James Moffatt, Union Theological Seminary. (died 1944)
William R. Taylor, University of Toronto.
George Dahl, Yale University.
Willard L. Sperry, Harvard University.
Leroy Waterman, University of Michigan.
Millar Burrows, Yale University. (joined 1938)
Kyle M. Yates, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
William F. Albright, Johns Hopkins University.
J. Philip Hyatt, Vanderbilt University.
Herbert G. May, Oberlin Graduate School of Theology.
Harry M. Orlinsky, Jewish Institute of Religion.

Though viciously attacked for its rendering of Isaiah 7:14, the RSV is a reliable English translation of the modern Greek eclectic text of Westcott Hort and Tischendorf, which almost perfectly agrees with the Nestle editions. Again, it is a good reliable representative of the modern eclectic Greek texts, it is not a reflection of the Majority or ancient Greek text of Antioch or Byzantium. It is much more reliable than say any paraphrase or many of the modern Bibles published today.

Suggested prices for used copies:


GOOD CONDITION: 1946, Norwood Press - 15.00

FINE: 35.00


GOOD CONDITION: 1946, Van Rees Press - 10.00

FINE: 30.00

(NOTE: Lacking publishing records, it is possible that the Van Rees Press edition may be rarer than the Norwood Press edition; if so, then the value estimates should be switched.)

Van Rees spine +

Van Rees and a later edition

 

Possibly the first printing dust jacket, certainly one of 1946.

0010

1946

The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: A New Translation. Ronald Arbuthnot Knox.

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Clementine Latin Vulgate

Accuracy of translation - - - - - 4

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 3

Value as a collectible book - - 6 (Chanticleer edition)

 

Sheed & Ward: New York. Printed by the Chanticleer Press of New York. Jacket reads: The New Testament: Illustrated: Translated by Ronald Knox. 502 pages, smyth sewn. Has 30 color illustrations, printed on glossy paper, illustrations are of famous paintings in various museums and galleries. Spine 24 cm.. Hardcover, blue cloth, title in silver color. Text is single column, with notes in the wide margins, verse numbers in text. At beginning of each chapter are woodcut illustrations from the 1493 Malermi Bible.

The first American printing, Sheed & Ward, (not Chanticleer) shows a copyright of 1944 (per Hills #2429). Numerous editions of the Sheed & Ward publication exist since the first American printing in 1944, with the Imprimatur of Archbishop Spellman, but the edition by the Chanticleer Press is most desirable (in my opinion). Copyright was renewed in 1972, by Sheed and Ward.


The Chanticleer Press was founded as a subsidiary of a London company, it became an independent company in 1952 under the leadership of its Austrian-born American founder, Paul Steiner (1913-1996). The company excelled as a repackager for other publishers, usually incorporating good quality color reproductions. The Chanticleer Press produced many coffee table type books, and is famous for its printings of the Audubon Society's Field Guide Series, published by Alfred A. Knopf.


The Knox translation claims to be based upon the Latin Vulgate, but it often departs. For example at Acts 19:20, it reads Lord, whereas the Vulgate has Dei (God). In the sample image on the right, in Acts 7, we can observe some added concepts not seen in any Latin MSS. In verse 4, the added word "only" has no support. In verse 7, they "left" Egypt, they did not not "escape" per Knox, again a change not according to the base text (the Clementine Vulgate). In verse 9, Knox adds "as a slave", again with utterly no support. Departures from the Latin Vulgate are also seen in his Old Testament translations as well (two volumes 1949, single volume 1955).

The New Testament was also privately printed in 1945 and after some five hundred alterations was subsequently authorized by the Hierarchy of England and Wales for public use. In 1945 a final edition was issued in Britain, it can be identified with the reading of "friends" at John 21:5, whereas the earlier 1944 printings read "lads", and at Matthew 1:1 the 1945 British edition reads: "A record of the ancestory from which Jesus Christ...", instead of: "A record of how Jesus Christ...". The Chanticleer edition preserves the 1944 readings.


GOOD CONDITION: Chanticleer - 35.00. FINE: 60.00
GOOD CONDITION: all pre-1945 - 25.00. FINE: 40.00

 

Knox, Acts 7

0011

Letters to Young Churches: A Translation of the New Testament Epistles. J. B. PhillipsThe Macmillan Company: New York. Copyright 1947.

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Greek text behind the 1881 revision, initially, then

..........later followed the Nestle editions.

Accuracy of translation - - - - - paraphrase

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 2

Value as a collectible book - - 5 (first edition)

Edition examined is the 22nd printing of 1955. Has from pages vii - x, an Introduction by C. S. Lewis, this is followed by a Translator’s Preface to page xv. Text is a true paraphrase, showing expansions and explanations within the text, as indicated by Phillips in his preface. Text begins with Romans, and ends at conclusion of Jude, page 230. Each epistle has a short introduction. Very dark blue hardcover, spine 21.5 cm.. Spine reads: Letters to Young Churches: Phillips: Macmillan. Has a lighter blue dust jacket with a short bio of Rev. Phillips on inside back. Inside front jacket, price printed is $2.75. Inside front cover, a map of the Mediterranean world. Paper is off-white, signatures are smyth sewn, a nice sturdy volume. Text is single column, with section heads, chapter and verse indications, paragraph format.

This work was first published in England in 1947. The gospels were next published in 1953. Acts in 1955, Revelation in 1957. In 1958 the entire New Testament was published. (Hills #2473). The 1958 title was: The New Testament in Modern English. Hills states that all but the complete NT were first printed in England (by Geoffrey Bles), then next in America. Copyright was renewed in 1986, by Vera M. Phillips, titled: The New Testament in Modern English.


By 1957, over 400,000 copies of Letters to Young Churches had been sold in England. The first printings of 1947 (England), or 1948 (America) are desirable. Note: in the 1955 21st printing, however, Phillips made two corrections, and justifies his controversial rendering of I Corinthians 14:22, (contained in a note titled: Preface to the Twenty-First Printing, xv). In the note Phillips actually states that Paul made an error, or that a textual corruption occurred! The note first occurs in the 21st printing, hence that printing is noteworthy. Images at right, are of the 22nd printing of 1955. Note the brief introduction (to James), and the reading of "Christ" at II Thessalonians 2:2, which is not per the Greek text of the 1881 revision, but rather that of the TR. As most readers of my reviews know, I am not a fan of paraphrases, but Phillips' is one of the better ones. Above all, it is easy to read. Do consult the 4 page PDF file for important supplementary data.


The popularity of these paraphrases is all the more remarkable as Phillips did not believe in the doctrine of Divine Inspiration, indicated in his preface; [refer to Supplemental PDF file to the right], and hence, to him, the original text was fallible! (One is left to wonder at the possible impact World War II had upon him, as he wrote most of the work in war-time London.). The edition of Letters to Young Churches, 1947/1948 was later revised in 1957. Thus Phillips' original work is only displayed in his first edition, (1947 - 1956) making them somewhat collectible. Suggested values include the dust jacket.


GOOD CONDITION: first printing - 15.00. FINE: 25.00
GOOD CONDITION: all other pre-1958 - 12.00. FINE: 20.00

GOOD CONDITION: complete NT, 1958 - 15.00. FINE : 25.00

Supplemental information: 4 page PDF file - J. B. Phillips

Phillips, James

 

 

 

Phillips, II Thessalonians

0012

The Westminster Study Edition of The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments: In the Authorized (King James) Version

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Accuracy of translation - - - - - per KJV

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 1

Value as a collectible book - - 2 or 3

The Westminster Study Edition of The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments: In the Authorized (King James) Version. Arranged in Paragraphs and in Verses, Together with Introductory Articles and Prefaces, Explanatory Footnotes, a Concordance, and Maps. The Westminster Press, Philadelphia. Copyright 1948 by W. L. Jenkins. Initial preface two pages. Followed by the table of contents and a six pages article "God Has Spoken", next a six page article, "The History of the Bible". Main body and articles begin on page 3 and continue to page 1376. An intertestamental article "Between the Times", (eight pages) precedes the New Testament, which is numbered 3 - 486. The NT text is followed by a 103 page concordance, and lastly a colored atlas of 16 plates with an index. Volume is hardcover, blue-denim colored. Spine is 24 cm.. Volume examined is the third printing. Hills may have examined the first printing. (Hills #2466). Words on spine: The Holy Bible: Westminster Study Edition: Concordance. Paper is a mellow white, quite thin [.0016"], showing moderate bleed. Volume is symth sewn, additional side stitching seen on first and last signatures. Psalms and other poetical works in poetical form; historical books, et al in paragraph form, each is single column. Notes at the foot of each page are in two columns. Book lays flat when opened (a very desirable aspect!). The 16 color maps are on heavier stock, and are very well done! Physically the volume is well made, nice margins; its primary fault, exceedingly thin paper.


The editors are/were largely influenced by the liberal views then popular at Princeton Theological Seminary. They are listed in the preface (pages viii - ix). The associated notes and articles are somewhat eccentric and liberal. Views presented are of a Reformed theological position. For example it sees the book of Isaiah as a composite of various authors and editors. Genesis is also viewed as a book with composite sources and multiple authors. The church in the New Testament is presented as "God's New Israel". Three gospels used a "Q" source, according to the notes, and "speaking with tongues" is said to be "...ecstatic, unintelligible expression of Christian joy" [note at Acts 2:1-4, page 214]. Hence, part of the value of this work, is its display and evidence of extreme liberalism which had invaded the denomination behind this effort (Presbyterian). It also presents data which was later known as incorrect via the Qumran finds (such as the late dating of the book of Daniel, which this Bible dates to 168 B.C.). It is assumed that numerous printings showed the same 1948 copyright date, however the printing number is shown at the foot of the copyright page. At some later date, the Westminster Press and the John Knox press combined and was named: Westminster John Knox Press.

Again its value lies in displaying the extreme liberalism which was destroying the Presbyterian religion, this book is therefore 1948 evidence. As a copy of the KJV, it is fine, but the notes can corrupt the users.


GOOD CONDITION: 15.00. FINE: 35.00

Westminster: Title page, third printing.

 

 

Westminster: I Corinthians 14/15

0013

The New Testament: A Translation in the Language of the People. Charles B. Williams.

BASE text - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Westcott and Hort, also codex 03

Accuracy of translation - - - - - paraphrase

Value to Christian faith - - - - - 2

Value as a collectible book - - 5

The New Testament: A Translation in the Language of the People. Charles B. Williams. Chicago: Moody Press. Edition examined is dated 1952. Original copyright is 1937. This 1952 edition is a reprint with the Publishers’ Preface (two pages), followed by a slightly revised Forward (Hills #2493) also of two pages, next appears a two page Introduction signed by: Edward A. McDowell, J. R. Mantey and John Mostert. Next is a one page Table of Contents, followed by a single page of Key to Footnotes. Text of New Testament, pages 11 - 575. Each book has a short introduction, (see sample image) each chapter has a brief heading. Text is single column format, verse numbers in text. At foot of each page are the notes via Williams. Spine is 20.25 cm.. Text on spine reads: The New Testament: Williams: Moody Press, with a Moody Press logo. Book is a hardcover, dark brick red in color. Paper is nice and supple, not a bright white, good on the eyes. Much of the book does not lie open, is a bit pudgy. Signatures are smyth sewn, volume is sturdy.

Charles Bray Williams (1860-1952) a Southern Baptist, earned a PhD in Greek from the University of Chicago. It would have been nice if he had a degree in English as well, for his English is atrocious.

In a 1956 edition, published by Moody, the title page read: The New Testament: A Private Translation in the Language of the People. William's text is also seen in The Four Translation New Testament, a parallel edition, (sans the footnotes) published in 1966, by Iverson Associates, for Decision Magazine, by World Wide Publications.

It has been reported that some other printings of this paraphrase lack most of Williams' footnotes, and this has been verified. According to Hills, Moody Bible Institute acquired the copyright to the work in 1949. The original 1937 publisher was Bruce Humphries, Inc., of Boston. (Hills #2362). The volume was reprinted in 1986, by Holman Bible Publishers. Copyright was renewed in 1965 by Edith S. (Mrs. Charles B.) Williams, and Mrs. Perry Sprawls. Jr. (Charlotte Williams Sprawls), titled: The New Testament; A Translation in the Language of the People.

Editions with the footnotes are of course, the more desirable. The footnotes explain and clarify. For example at Acts 4:12, Williams renders the verse as:

"There is no salvation by anyone else..."

He comments upon the "by" and indicates that he renders or sees it as a preposition denoting the instrument. Most other versions render this preposition here as "in". Perhaps he did so so as to agree with the function of the second occurrence of this preposition, in the verse: "...as our only medium by which to be saved." Jesus Christ is seen as the Agent or the Instrument, most likely BOTH functions apply here. Williams is to be congratulated for bravely advancing the possibility that Jesus may be seen here as the Agent (his instrument); this note reveals some of the talent and ability of Williams. He has potential! But..., Williams will often generate some odd or difficult renderings, for example note this rendering of Romans 3:25,

"For God once publicly offered Him in His death as a sacrifice of reconciliation through faith, to demonstrate His own justice (for in His forebearance God had passed over men's former sins);"

It is probably an error to render "blood" as "death". The original Greek literally focuses the readers' attention upon "faith in His blood"; in Williams' rendering the actual object of the faith is not very clear. The aorist tense "demonstrated" (proetheto) [Williams' "once publicly offered"] most likely is a single occurrence, an act not repeated, thus Williams adds "once". Yet in hundreds of other occurrences of the aorist tenses, he does not add a word to signify the singularity of the action. He did so here so as to emphasize to the reader this important act. Thus, a degree of manipulation of the text is evident in William's translation. This manipulation, sincere as it is, is one of the primary failures of the (or, any) paraphrase to give an accurate rendering of the source text(s).

In the upper sample image on the right, (Ephesians) his rendering of Ephesians chapter one, is at best confusing. I cannot image how Dr. Williams, or anyone in their right mind, could state that William's rendition of this chapter is understandable, or an improvement in communication. Herein, we note a sad digression, Williams actually hinders a readers' understanding of the once Holy Writ. Ephesians one, is reckless, wild and should never have been printed! Thus, the theological value of the entire effort is quite low, in my opinion. Perhaps collectors may find value in the book as an object. Finally, in verse one of Ephesians he adds the footnote: "(a) Order of Vat. Ms." a senseless note, as both Westcott and Hort and codex 03, read identically. Was he using or referencing another Greek text? One wonders!

In the Forward, Dr. Williams states that "Our translation is based upon the Westcott and Hort Greek New Testament". He also states that, in the case wherein variants occur, he has followed the Vatican (codex 03) manuscript which he also says is conceded to be the oldest and the best. This paraphrase contains all of Mark (the long ending), omits the text of John 8:1-11 (the Woman Caught in Adultery), omits "in Ephesus"at Ephesians 1:1. Oftentimes quite free in his paraphrase, as for example at I Corinthians 2:15, wherein he renders anakrinetai (literally - "thoroughly evaluates") as "appreciated", which even for a paraphrase is misleading. The 1937 edition, is of course, worth about twice the value of this later reprint. This particular edition (1950-52 reprint) is a nice volume, well made, and is a good book via which one can possess a copy of this paraphrase, a paraphrase with some good renderings, most likely by accident! The first edition was available in a dust jacket.

GOOD CONDITION: 1937 - 25.00. FINE: 40.00
GOOD CONDITION: 1950-1952 - 10.00. FINE: 20.00

C. B. Williams - 1952 text..

 

Williams' omission of "the Woman Caught in Adultery", 1952 edition.

 

A 1958 dust jacket

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